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News and Updates

Autumn Term

PE and equipment

PE lessons will take place twice a week and held outside where possible. Due to Covid 19 and the health and safety precautions that we need to put in place, children will not be getting changed for PE, and will remain in their school uniform for the duration of the lesson. We appreciate that this is not an ideal situation, however we need to minimise the risk.  However, It is important that your child wears appropriate footwear to prevent unwanted injuries.  

Jewellery

Children are not permitted to wear jewellery to school for health and safety reasons except for a watch if desired or small stud earrings but these must be removed for PE and
 swimming lessons. Teaching staff are not permitted to assist with the removal of earrings and if children are not able to remove them independently, they will not be allowed to take part in the lesson. 



Water 

Please ensure that your child brings enough water to last them the day. Children will be allowed to fill their bottles from the taps in the classroom but the water coolers will not be available when school reopen in September.  The children may bring juice for packed lunch but water only for the classroom please.

Lost property

Please make sure that every item of your child’s school uniform including their water bottle and any other equipment is clearly named. It is nearly impossible to work out whose sweatshirt is whose in a class full of children.

Lost property is stored but children losing an item of clothing should try to find it straight away. It is much easier to find something on the day on which it has been lost rather than weeks later. 


Healthy Snacks


Children may bring a healthy snack to school for their morning break. As we promote a healthy lifestyle, we ask that children do not bring sweets, chocolate bars or fizzy drinks to school. Fruit, dried fruit, yogurts, cheese and health bars are all classed as healthy. The snack should be brought to school separately to their packed lunch. 

We now have three children with significant nut allergies in school. Can we remind all parent/carers to please not send their child to school with any food products that contain nuts.  Thank you.

Due to Covid 19, the school Tuck Shop will be closed for the time being. We will let you know when it reopens. 


Reading 

Did you know that the number of parents sharing stories with their children is in steep decline? 


  • Only 56% of 3-4 year olds are read to daily or nearly every day (69% in 2013)  
  • Fewer than 19% of 8-10 year olds are read to daily or nearly every day (down from 25%) There are only 29% of 0-13 year olds that read for pleasure daily. 


A child's reading skills are important to their success in school as they will allow them to access the breadth of the curriculum and improve their communication and language kills. In addition, reading can be a fun and imaginative time for children, which opens doors to all kinds of new words for them.

With a very busy timetable, teachers currently do not have the time to listen to their children read as much as they would like to. Parents are the most important educators in a child's life - even more important than their teachers and you can make a huge difference. You can help your child by encouraging your child to read or by reading with them at home every night, for at least 10 minutes. We hope that you and your child create many loving memories as you explore books together. Sharing a book together with your child is time for bonding, relaxing and gives you the opportunity to escape into another world with your child. Parents are the most important educators in a child’s life – even more important than their teachers.

Why is Reading so Important? 

Studies show that reading for pleasure makes a big difference to a children's educational performance. Likewise, evidence suggests that children who read for enjoyment every day not only perform better in reading tests than those who do not, but also develop a broader vocabulary, increased in general knowledge and a better understanding of of other cultures.  In fact, reading for pleasure is more likely to determine whether a child does well at school than their social or economic background.

1. Children who read often and widely get better at it.

After all, practice makes perfect in almost everything humans do, and reading in no different.

 

2. Reading exercises our brain.

Reading is a much more complex task for the human brain rather than watching TV, for example. Reading strengthens brains connections and builds NEW connections.

 

3. Reading improves concentration.

Children have to sit still and quietly so that they can focus on the story when they are reading. If the read often, they will develop the skill to do this for longer.

 

4. Reading teaches children about the world around them.

Through reading a variety of books children learn about people, places, and events outside of their own experience.

 

5. Reading improves vocabulary and language skills.

Learning to read is about listening and understanding as well as working out what is printed on the page. Through hearing stories, children are exposed to a wide range of words. This helps them build their own vocabulary and improve their understanding when they listen, which is vital as they start to read. It is important for them to understand how stories work too. Even if your child does not understand every word, they will hear new sounds, words and phrases which they can then try out, copying what they have heard. Subconsciously, they absorb information on how to structure sentences and how to use words and other language features effectively in their writing and speaking. 

 

6. Reading develops a child's imagination.

As we read our brains translate the descriptions we read of people, places and things into pictures. While we are engaged in a story we are also imagining how a character is feeling. Young children then bring this knowledge into their everyday play.

 

7. Reading helps children to develop empathy.

As children develop they begin to imagine how they would feel in that situation.

 

8. Reading is fun.

A book or an e-reader doesn't take up much space and is light to carry, so you take it anywhere so you can never be bored if you have a book in your bag.

 

9. Reading is a great way to spend time together.

Reading together on the sofa, bedtimes stories and visiting the library are just some ways of spending time together.

 

10. Children who read achieve better in school.

Reading promotes achievement in all subjects, not just English. Children who are good readers tend to achieve better across the curriculum.It is a well known fact that good readers make good writers. 

Top 10 tips to help children enjoy reading.

To help make reading enjoyable and fun, here is what the experts and authors recommend to help get children reading

 1. Make books part of your family life – Always have books around so that you and your children are ready to read whenever there’s a chance. Stories can be shared with the family so why not invite siblings or other family members to join in. Take time to look together at the words and pictures in a story and when reading take it in turns. 
 2. Join your local library – Get your child a library card. You’ll find the latest video games, blu-rays and DVDs, plus tons and tons of fantastic books. Allow them to pick their own books, encouraging their own interests. 
3. Match their interests – Help them find the right book - it doesn’t matter if it’s fiction, poetry, comic books or non-fiction. Don't be afraid to use funny voices - it's a great way to make your child giggle. 
4. All reading is good – Don’t discount non-fiction, comics, graphic novels, magazines and leaflets. Reading is reading and it is all good. 
5. Get comfortable! – Snuggle up somewhere warm and cosy with your child, either in bed, on a beanbag or on the sofa, or make sure they have somewhere comfy when reading alone. 
6. Ask questions – To keep them interested in the story, ask your child questions as you read such as, ‘What do you think will happen next?’ or ‘Where did we get to last night? Can you remember what had happened already?’ When you talk to your child about what is happening in a book, give them plenty of time to respond. 
7. Read whenever you get the chance – Bring along a book or magazine for any time your child has to wait, such as at a doctor’s surgery. 
8. Read again and again – Encourage your child to re-read favourite books and poems. Re-reading helps to build up fluency and confidence. 
9. Bedtime stories – Regularly read with your child or children at bedtime. It’s a great way to end the day and to spend valuable time with your child. 
10. Rhyme and repetition – Books and poems which include rhyme and repetition are great for encouraging your child or children to join in and remember the words. “We need

Irrespective of whether they are fluent readers or not, you can play an important role in helping to keep them interested in books. Find out what interests them, help them to find books that will be engaging and fun, and spend time reading the books they bring home from school together.

A list of the top 100 books to read to children in year 3 and 4 can be found at the bottom of this page. 

Reading Diaries 

A Reading Diary will be given to each child to record what they are reading at the start of the school year.  We ask that you support your child by listening to them read every night for at least 10 minutes and then complete their reading records and return to school for signing the next day. Children can select a reading book from school to bring home along with their diary, however due Coronavirus we will be sending them home in a zippy plastic wallet which needs to be used to return the book and diary to school the next day. 


Homework 


Homework will be set once a week and is expected to be completed for the following week. Due to Covid 19, where possible, we aim to set homework online. This is to limit the amount of paperwork coming home and returning to school, therefore reducing the risk. We will provide alternatives for those where working online is not an option. 



The Bears of Sheffield. 

Do you remember the elephant sculptures from the Herd of Sheffield? Well, the sculpture trail is back for another year as bears are set to take to the streets of Sheffield in July 2020. This exciting new project is brought to you by The Children’s Hospital Charity and will unite businesses, communities, artists and schools throughout the city and across the country, leaving a lasting legacy for years to come. 

The Herd of Sheffield raised over £610,000 for Sheffield Children’s Hospital with 58 large and 72 small elephants and they hope to raise even more for the hospital through the Bears of Sheffield. This time around they have 100 Little Bears sponsored and decorated by schools and 60 Big Bears sponsored by businesses and painted by professional artists. Both will be available to be seen on the trail this summer running from July to September across Sheffield.


All funds raised through the Bears of Sheffield will help to transform the Cancer and Leukaemia Ward at Sheffield Children’s Hospital. The ward treats children from babies through to 19 year olds from South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Derbyshire and as far south as Northampton. The transformed ward would create a new home from home for families with space, privacy and natural light to make hospital stays and isolation a place of sanctuary and calm.

As a school, we are very fortunate to be allocated a 'Bear' to sponsor last year prior to school closing. The event has been postponed until this year and we are hoping to start looking at fundraising ideas once school reopens.


 

Staff Car park 

Please can we ask all parent/carers not to park in the staff car park when collecting pupils from school.  Children walk through the car park to leave the premises.  Please ensure that you always park in a sensible place following the legal guidelines when parking to collect your child from school.  Thank you.  
  


Times tables 

The National Curriculum sets out expectations for times tables knowledge and states that by Year 4 children should be able to recall multiplication and division facts up to 12x12.Knowing the tables facts (including division) means having rapid recall – being able to say the answer within about eight seconds, not counting through the times tables to work it out.Don't forget about TT Rockstars, which is a carefully sequenced programme of daily times table practice.This extremely popular online resource has very successfully boosted times tables recall speed for hundreds of thousands of pupils over the last 8 years in over 14,000 schools. Please encourage your child to use this fantastic resource at home.

For more information, click on the following link https://play.ttrockstars.com/auth/school/studen



Social Media 


Last academic year we have had to deal with an increasing number of social media incidents in school. The incidents are occurring online at home and children are then bringing the issues into school where we are having to deal with them. Children are often very upset and it is causing friendship issues which is then taking up learning time to sort out. The two apps that children are using are Tiktok and Instagram. Both these apps are rated for children aged 13 years+.

The age limit is in place to keep children safe whilst online and to prevent them accessing inappropriate material. Please refer to the information on these links for further details

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/…/parents-ultimate-guide-t…

https://www.commonsensemedia.org/…/parents-ultimate-guide-t…

We would encourage all parents to read these guides and follow the restriction information. Please talk to your child about always being kind to others. Ensure you have access to what your child is posting and that you know how they are using their time on the internet.


If these problems continue we will have no other option but to report children who are underage to the website.







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Mrs Pearce,
24 Jan 2020, 00:10